Remarkable Children (Part One)

That's us, Christmas 2012. I wanted a serious group photo of me and my beautiful children. What did I get instead? A holy giggle of healing love every time I look at it.

That’s us, Christmas 2012. I wanted a serious group photo of me and my beautiful children. What did I get instead? A holy giggle of healing love every time I look at it.

I have remarkable children of great value and worth.

I know, I know. All parents think their children are wonderful, but mine truly are.

There is my oldest and my only daughter, so smart and pretty and brave. And I have three sons who are strong and nurturing and incredibly aware and intelligent. All of them crack me up and keep me in stitches with their wicked sense of humor.

My daughter and I talk nearly every day, sometimes twice or three times a day. We talk about everything — we offer to each other our fears, we share our moments of strength, we complain whine and complain, we praise and we give thanks, we celebrate, and we mourn together. We talk over our problems and we offer each other solutions or we just listen to each other’s stories when there is nothing else that can be said. We text, we Facebook message, we email, we talk on the phone.

Through the amazing technology of today, I can keep in touch with my three boys who live so far apart from each other. I have one son in Portland, another near Seattle, and one living almost exactly in between his oldest and youngest brother and along the same stretch of freeway that connects them. They are each very different men, but they are connected through one mother and one set of remarkable attributes.

My children are my four pillars of strength and fortitude, they are my comfort, and they are often my entertainment. Yes, sometimes they roll their eyes at me and scold me, sometimes they sigh in frustration, they may even get angry at me at times — but they love me, fiercely love me, as I love them. They are my children.

You are God’s child, we are God’s children.

God asked me to tell you today how very remarkable you are. You are strong and you are beautiful and you are smart and you are so very capable. You are his child, you are a very remarkable child, and he loves you very, very much.

♥km

"Laughter is carbonated holiness," says author Anne Lamott. I must be getting close to being a Saint by now.

“Laughter is carbonated holiness,” says author Anne Lamott. I must be getting close to being a Saint by now. In the first photo you can see by the look on my face that I wasn’t very happy with the antics of my children, but then I decided to just lean into it and let it be. Do you think I would have remembered this moment more or would have cherished it more had they done what I asked them to? No, letting those we love be who they are is the best gift we can give each other. And, btw, God gave that gift to us first, let us give thanks.

The peace of God, which passes all understanding, keep your hearts and minds in the knowledge and love of God, and of his Son Jesus Christ our Lord; and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, be amongst you, and remain with you always. Amen.

5 Comments

  1. They are who they are in large part because of the mama they have. Blessed be all. xo

    • Avatar of Kimberly Mason, p/SSG

      As my mother responds to people when they say how much I look like her (and she is a beautiful woman!), “Poor thing!” But I like to think the best parts of them have come from me and blame the rest on their father. ;)

  2. Carbonated holiness indeed! I kind of like that sideways look you have going on in the first picture.

  3. I love both photos, but I snort at the “I’m gonna moon you” posture in the second. I’m grateful for you that you enjoy the blessing of children.

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